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Babe Ruth Baseball

Youth baseball is in decline and what’s left of community programs are being decimated by expensive, elite, private teams. So we tied the appeal of baseball back to its grounded roots through a showcase TV spot and backed it up with a social campaign and content-heavy minisite.

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Youth baseball is in decline, and what’s left of community programs, like Babe Ruth Baseball, are being decimated by expensive, elite, private teams.

 

 

 

 

This causes a deep divide in the accessibility of baseball nationwide. Our challenge was to make baseball appealing to the kids, but more importantly to their parents who are still the major decision makers.

Art Director: Kaitlyn Bryan   +   Videographer: Michael Neary   +   Writer, Editor: Thom Fountain


 
We tied the appeal of baseball back to its grounded roots through a showcase TV spot that aired during the most watched World Series in decades, targeting the nostalgia of parents who remember their days playing youth sports.
 

:30 SCRIPT

In 1956 a group of guys in Eau Claire, Wisconsin got together and decided to play ball. They called it Babe Ruth.

They didn’t wear fancy uniforms.
They didn’t have the nicest, newest gear.

What they did was throw strikes.
What they did was hit it a mile.
What they did was run hard and slide even harder.
What they did was win championships.
What they did --

and still do --

is play ball.

Learn more about the past and future at Eau Claire Babe Ruth dot org.


 
We then built on that message with social content aimed towards young parents, and a minisite with stories from generations of Babe Ruth players.
 


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“It puts fathers and sons together, families together. I get a big kick out of seeing the grandparents show up for tournaments, and them all hugging each other in the parking lot before they leave. It makes it all worthwhile to see them all together.”
— Mark Ryser, Babe Ruth Baseball President